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Q&A

How to add a partition of Disk 1, to another partition of Disk 0?

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I use Windows 10. How do I add the yellow partition to the red one, to increase the size of red? Green (833 GB) must be left alone, and must not be changed or moved.

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x-post https://superuser.com/q/1128970/383391 (1 comment)

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+4
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If you ask strictly about partitions, then you can't...

One partition is on one disk, the other partition is on another disk. Therefore, you cannot combine/merge both partitions. One part(ition) of a disk cannot be at the same time also be a part(ition) of a separate disk.

(That is, unless you would utilize some disk controller or low-level storage device driver which presents the two separate disks as a single logical disk to the operating system, like RAID0 or Windows Storage Spaces, for example; but i digress and that would also not preserve your existing partitions...)


However, what you could perhaps do is creating a (directory) junction on drive C:, which would refer/link the root folder of the 2nd/yellow partition. (The 2nd partition would need to be formatted, of course.)

To create a junction, use a cmd console shell with admin privileges and type:

mklink /J <junction_name> <existing_target_directory>

where <junction_name> is the path and name of the junction to be created. For all practical purposes, the junction will appear and function like a directory.

<existing_target_directory> is the full path of the directory the junction will refer/point to.


For example,

mklink /J C:\foo\bar F:\

will create the junction "bar" in the directory "C:\foo", with the content of the root directory of F: appearing in "C:\foo\bar". CD'ing/navigating into "C:\foo\bar" makes the content of "F:\" appear as if it were the content of the directory "C:\foo\bar".

In other words, if there is for example a file F:\baz.txt, it could then also be accessed by the path C:\foo\bar\baz.txt. And if you were to create a file (or directory) C:\foo\bar\somedir\file.dat, it would not be stored on the partition of drive C:, but it would be stored on the partition of drive F: (with its "true" storage location being F:\somedir\file.dat).

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