Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs

Dashboard
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

How do I start diagnosing why a Windows Server turns itself off?

+4
−0

We have a Windows Server, running Microsoft 2019 Essentials that is supposed to be on all of the time, but after a couple of days it will turn itself off, and then we have to manually turn it back on.

How do I start the process of trying to figure out why it's turning off? Are there Windows logs somewhere that I can look at?

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

1 comment thread

First figure out the kind of "turning off" you are dealing with. Is it a regular shutdown by the OS, ... (3 comments)

1 answer

+4
−0

I don't know much about the server versions, but for Windows in general, you'll want to peek in the Event Viewer.

It contains all the logs, floods of information, most of it irrelevant and uninteresting stuff. The "Administrative Events" and "System" logs are the relevant ones for tracking down unexpected power downs. In particular, you'll want to look for red cross icons (critical errors) in those logs. But red exclamation mark icons (errors) could also be relevant in case you are looking for something specific.

It helps a lot if you know the exact or at least rough time when something bad happened. Once you find an error you can read a bit of textual explanation there, or grab the event id and go search online for it. Since these error codes tend to be very technical.

For example on Windows 10 client, you'll have some event 41 Kernel-Power, which gets logged when the computer has an unexpected shut-down. Which in turn could be caused by a power outage, someone deliberately plugging out the power, PSU failing and so on.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

You can also join us in chat!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!