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Q&A

How to quickly change the maximum processor state in Windows 10?

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I am using a Lenovo Legion laptop and one thing I have noticed is the fan working at full speed from time to time. This seems to be related to the CPU jumping to a high frequency to deliver more processing power.

Since I rarely need all that power, I have changed the power plan to not allow CPU to go beyond 99% (Processor power management -> maximum processor state = 99%).

This prevented the CPU from going to higher frequencies (Power Boost Option?) and the fan almost never goes to a high speed.

Currently, I am making the switch manually and it is quite tedious: power plan -> change advance power settings -> change the maximum processor state.

I would like to make this as simple as possible, ideally using shortcut keys to use my default (99%) and 100% maximum processor state.

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Maybe through a Powershell script, or WMIC? (2 comments)

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While finding a way (e.g. through Powershell) to exactly change the Maximum process state, I think a better way is to have at least two power plans. This allows changing other settings as well for each case (normal vs. high power) without touching the scripts or the setup below.

Assuming the one with the maximum 99% for the processor state is the default one:

  • create a power scheme by starting from your default
  • change the processor state to 100%
  • in Command prompt list all the existing power schemes (example from my case):
powercfg -list

Existing Power Schemes (* Active)
-----------------------------------
Power Scheme GUID: 381b4222-f694-41f0-9685-ff5bb260df2e  (Balanced) *
Power Scheme GUID: fb35609a-a462-4312-8dd2-e4635bd5f21d  (Balanced with 100% CPU)
  • create shortcuts to include a command to switch to the desired power scheme (plan). Examples from my case:

Target = C:\Windows\System32\powercfg.exe /setactive 381b4222-f694-41f0-9685-ff5bb260df2e Shortcut key = Ctrl + Alt + Down

Target = C:\Windows\System32\powercfg.exe /setactive fb35609a-a462-4312-8dd2-e4635bd5f21d Short key = Ctrl + Alt + Up

Testing can be done by opening Control Panel\Hardware and Sound\Power Options and checking the shortcuts. Windows updates (with some delay) the selected power plan based on issued commands:

Windows 10 Power options -> Choose or customize a power plan

References:

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